Sunday, August 5, 2012

Erin's Diva Challenge

Thank goodness for the Diva Challenges. It seems like lately that's the only thing that gets me to STOP EVERYTHING for just a bit and savor the joy of tangling. This week's guest challenge comes from Erin Olson, CZT. Erin and I met at the Zentangle Seminar (7) in Providence, and we had quite a few great conversations about Zentangle AND beading!
   Erin has developed some awesome Zendala templates that she offers on her site. She also has a weekly challenge, using her templates as your guide.
   When I come home from the beadstore, I want to plop onto the couch and watch some mindless drivel about various unreal housewives or better yet, an old black and white movie that lulls me to sleep. Yesterday, after a really long (but fun!) day, it was too early to do that, as I knew if I sat there, it would be hours before I moved. So before I sat down (in front of the tv, of course), I grabbed a drawing tablet and got ready to tangle. My printer wasn't working to print out Erin's template, so I decided to just freehand an organic version onto my paper. There is no way to be exact in this situation, so I let the template on the screen be symmetrical, while mine was off center, uneven and pretty much all over the place. Not a pretty string, but I could get past that.
    I started by opening up my tangle library to an arbitrary spot. (I also decided NOT to turn on the tv!) I landed on Squill, so I thought the center would take that on quite well. I then found the negative spaces around the inside "flower" of the template, and made those shapes (Paradox) instead of concentrating on the obvious shapes. Doing the negative (or opens spaces) shifts my brain into seeing a different way. This process helps me use the shapes as guides to other paths, rather than shapes to simply fill. Once I'm finished, I don't often remember how I got from one place to the next. I think it might be fun to make a video to watch later, as if someone else was creating it. I'm sure I would see lots of things I wasn't aware of the first time it was made.
   Thanks, Diva for always being there, and thanks, Erin for a really fun challenge. Thanks Rick and Maria for this magical artform.


13 comments:

  1. That use of the negative spaces to lead you down other paths and not just fill in shapes with patterns is one of the best things about your style and why I keep coming back to look at your work. I strive to do that as well, not always successfully and nearly as well as you, but that is an element of all my own favorite pieces. Thanks for sharing!

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  2. You are always so inspiring in your approach to the challenges. I love how you use the box and then fly off into fanciful beautiful tangles! I love your response to the challenge! So glad you have a bit of time to share!

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  3. Carole, your work just gets better and better. I find I am now saving nearly everything you do to try and copy/practice later. Your lovely, flowy style is my fave. ♥

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  4. I'm not good with a printer & have been put off by not being that adept at transferring patterns (perfectionist imp sits on shoulders & screams at me) so this is an amazing approach. Very new to tangling & totally intrigued by your approach - thank you. Paula (PEP)

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  5. It is very nice to see how your zentangle-zendala grows. It is very playfull.

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  6. It's Amazing how very creative this Zendala is!
    You are a very talented artist with a very special style.
    I always love to see your work, it's so very inspiring!

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  7. That is so gorgeous. I have so much to learn still to be able to do something like that. Thanks so much for sharing it.

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  8. You have the most fabulous work!! And thanks for the description of your creative process....I always love to hear/see how works of art are brought to life!!

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  9. It's so wonderful and hearing how you arrived at it made it even better. I so envy people who can "color" outside the lines. I tend to be so rigid. And to have made your own template, too.
    I'm quite impressed...and inspired.
    Barbara

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  10. I really prefer your irregular shapes to a perfectly symmetrical string (though that's a beautiful look too). The drawings based on an irregular string have more life!

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